The musicians of St John’s Episcopal Church, Dallas, music ministry strive to glorify the Triune God as revealed in Holy Scripture, so that His people might be edified through music. With nearly 70 years’ tradition of sacred music, St John’s music ministry continues to learn, promote, and offer the highest quality liturgical and sacred music. Concerts and other special events are musical features of this music ministry. If you wish to participate through playing an instrument or singing, contact Benjamin Kolodziej, Organist and Choirmaster (bkolodziej@stjohnsepiscopal.org).

What Wondrous Love is This

This hymn text was written anonymously and first published in Lynchburg, VA in A General Selection of Spiritual Songs (1811).  This tune, also composed anonymously and most likely best defined as a “folk tune,” first originates in print in Southern Harmony, New Haven, 1835.  The tune is “modal,” meaning it is neither major nor minor, […]

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If Thou But Suffer God to Guide Thee

This morning the choir sings an anthem version of this German chorale, it is played as the communion voluntary, and sung as a communion hymn. This hymn, often sung during Lent, was written by Georg Neumark (1621-1681), a hymnwriter for whom the most productive part of his life was spent in the midst of the […]

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Saviour, Again, to Thy Dear Name We Raise

This text was written by John Ellerton (1826-1893), an English country priest who enjoyed not only composing sacred verse (“The Day Thou Gavest, Lord is Ended”) but was a frequent collaborator on that great nineteenth-century English hymnal, Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861, although this hymn did not appear until the 1868 edition.) Ellerton closes the […]

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Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing

This beloved hymn text was written by Robert Robinson (27 September 1735 – 9 June 1790), an English Dissenting minister who seemed to spend his life searching for truth. He early rejected a belief in infant baptism, which caused some trouble with the Anglicans when he went to study at Cambridge. . . with his […]

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