The musicians of St John’s Episcopal Church, Dallas, music ministry strive to glorify the Triune God as revealed in Holy Scripture, so that His people might be edified through music. With nearly 70 years’ tradition of sacred music, St John’s music ministry continues to learn, promote, and offer the highest quality liturgical and sacred music. Concerts and other special events are musical features of this music ministry. If you wish to participate through playing an instrument or singing, contact Benjamin Kolodziej, Organist and Choirmaster (bkolodziej@stjohnsepiscopal.org).

The Day of Resurrection

This hymn was written by John of Damascus, one of the great poets of the Greek Church. He was born at the end of the 600s (in Damascus). His brother, aptly named by his proud parents Cosmas the Melodist, was educated by an Italian monk (also named Cosmas) whom they captured and pressed into slavery […]

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Sing, My Tongue, the Glorious Battle

The hymn “Sing, my Tongue, the Glorious Battle” is one of the more ancient texts in Christian hymnody; the tune, called Pange Lingua, derives from a plainsong of equally ancient origin. This text was written by the Spanish monk and lawyer Venantius Honorius Fortunatus (c. 540-c. 600 AD), an Italian (by this time Rome had […]

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Where Charity and Love Prevail

This hymn text is derived from a Latin chant for Maundy Thursday, “Ubi caritas.”  Maundy Thursday’s liturgy focuses on Jesus’ mandatum novum, or “new command” in John 13: 34, “If you love me, you will keep my commandments.”  As Jesus washes His disciples’ feet that evening, He demonstrated that He is a servant, exemplifying our […]

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When I Survey

This beloved hymn comes from Isaac Watts (1676-1748), the revolutionary hymnist whose daring paraphrases of scripture in his hymns would permanently transform what had been a highly conservative approach to hymnody in English-speaking churches.  Although a Dissenter himself (ie, not a member of the Anglican Church), neither the Dissenting nor the Anglican liturgical tradition employed […]

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